What You’re Doing Wrong on Your LinkedIn Profile

Your LinkedIn Profile and common oversights that could be hinder its usefulness.

Last week, I had the privilege of speaking to a group of ambitious young Asian American professionals in Los Angeles about how they could use LinkedIn to build their careers. A few brave souls volunteered to have their profiles critiqued in front of 50+ people, and even more reached out to me afterwards to ask for private LinkedIn profile advice. After reviewing a dozen LinkedIn profiles over the weekend, I noticed some common oversights –

  1. You don’t have a professional profile photo. Your profile is 11x more likely to be viewed if you have a profile photo. That’s a big deal. My general rule for profile photos on LinkedIn is to show up on LinkedIn like you would show up to an interview in your industry. For attorneys, that might be you in a suit and tie but for an engineer, you can show up in a hackday t-shirt.
  2. Your Headline is your current job title. The headline is one of the first things people see on your profile. Your headline automatically defaults to your current job title, but your job title may not tell the whole story about who you are as a professional. For example, your job title might be “Sales Associate”, but the value you really provide as a sales person are your big ideas and focus on your clients so your headline could be more descriptive: “Big Idea, Client-Focused Salesperson”.
  3. Your public profile URL is not customized. It’s a whole lot easier for you and others to share your LinkedIn public profile URL when it is not a string of random letters and numbers, so take 20 seconds to customize it.

(…read more)

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The Mighty Middle Market

The Mighty Middle market companies, or those with between $10 million and $1 billion in revenues in this case, are “a key driving force behind the U.S. economy,” according to the research report released today jointly with Ohio State University’s Fisher College of Business, but “virtually ignored” by the media and policy-makers. The group comprises some 200,000 companies with more than $9 trillion in combined annual revenues, according to the study’s analysis of U.S. census data. (…more)

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Double-Dip Recession Fears Overblown

Cash-flow Report Shows Revenues Rising, Fears of Double-Dip Recession Overblown.

Rather than reflecting concerns about a return to an economic recession, corporations sported a sales surge of 15% and a rise in median cash flow of 4% between the first and second quarters of this year, according to a new quarterly report on cash-flow trends issued by the Georgia Tech Financial Analysis Lab.

“We’re seeing a continuation of investments in inventory and capital assets, an improvement in operating cushion, and generally the first signs of robust revenue growth that we’ve seen in many quarters,” says Charles Mulford, a Georgia Tech accounting professor who directs the lab. (Operating cushion is operating profit exclusive of noncash expenses, depreciation, and amortization.) (…more)

 

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Candidates: How to select a recruiting firm

How to Select Recruiting Firm

When you’re unemployed or looking for a career change, it’s tempting to think that a professional can help you land the perfect job. A recruiter’s role is to help match your experience and interests up with a similar open position. A good recruiter can provide you with helpful job leads and advice on how to best position yourself to land a job. Here is a check list of items to consider:

Recruiters Know Where the Jobs Are

Administrative assistants, IT professionals, doctors, lawyers, CFOs, and construction workers, to name a few, have found careers through the recruiting profession. Recruiting firms in the United States have jobs in virtually all occupations, including some that might be considered out of the ordinary, such as restaurant maître des, teachers, business managers, dentists and dental hygienists.

Businesses of all sizes and specialties turn to recruiting firms for access to talent. They know that recruiting/staffing companies are experts in recruiting and matching employees.

Recruiters Are Specialists

It’s important to find a recruiter or recruiting firm that specializes in your field. Use the NAPS directory to find a specialist. Ask friends and former colleagues if they have anyone they would recommend. Interview a potential recruiter to find out exactly what they promise to deliver. Ask for references and their success rate of placing people within your field of interest. Ask them to evaluate your resume and let you know, upfront, what they think of their potential to place you. Develop the relationship with the recruiter that you choose. If you have a good relationship with a recruiter, they might keep you in mind when another job opens up.

Know Whose Paying Their Bill

Recruiters either receive a placement fee from a firm or they charge job seekers a flat fee for identifying job leads and securing interviews. In this day and age, most recruiters will receive their fee from the hiring or client company, and, for the most part, only when the fire is made. The incentive is for the recruiter to perform. If you’re paying a recruiter to find you job openings, then they work for you. Recognize up front whom your recruiter is working for. (Read More)

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