The Most Comprehensive LinkedIn Profile Guide

Most Comprehensive Guide to Update your LinkedIn ProfileThis comprehensive 22-point LinkedIn Profile Guide outlines the sections and how to accomplish the updates.

Understanding the components of developing a robust LinkedIn Profile is a key piece of having success in your job search using LinkedIn. With the knowledge gained as professional resume writer and executive job search coach, and a former recruiter, I’ve created a comprehensive 22-point check list outlining the sections to complete for your LinkedIn profile and guidance on how to complete these sections with optimum results. (…more)

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What You’re Doing Wrong on Your LinkedIn Profile

Your LinkedIn Profile and common oversights that could be hinder its usefulness.

Last week, I had the privilege of speaking to a group of ambitious young Asian American professionals in Los Angeles about how they could use LinkedIn to build their careers. A few brave souls volunteered to have their profiles critiqued in front of 50+ people, and even more reached out to me afterwards to ask for private LinkedIn profile advice. After reviewing a dozen LinkedIn profiles over the weekend, I noticed some common oversights –

  1. You don’t have a professional profile photo. Your profile is 11x more likely to be viewed if you have a profile photo. That’s a big deal. My general rule for profile photos on LinkedIn is to show up on LinkedIn like you would show up to an interview in your industry. For attorneys, that might be you in a suit and tie but for an engineer, you can show up in a hackday t-shirt.
  2. Your Headline is your current job title. The headline is one of the first things people see on your profile. Your headline automatically defaults to your current job title, but your job title may not tell the whole story about who you are as a professional. For example, your job title might be “Sales Associate”, but the value you really provide as a sales person are your big ideas and focus on your clients so your headline could be more descriptive: “Big Idea, Client-Focused Salesperson”.
  3. Your public profile URL is not customized. It’s a whole lot easier for you and others to share your LinkedIn public profile URL when it is not a string of random letters and numbers, so take 20 seconds to customize it.

(…read more)

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6 Reasons to Keep Resume Updated

6 Reasons to Keep Resume Updated – If you’ve been happily employed at the same job for several years, there’s a good chance your resume has been gathering virtual cobwebs. You’re certainly not alone—my resume has yet to be updated with anything I’ve done for the past year and a half or so on the job.

And if you’re not planning on searching for a new gig anytime soon, you might think this is perfectly fine. Well, I’m here to tell you that, unfortunately, it’s not.

In fact, a polished resume (and LinkedIn profile!) can be almost as valuable to you now as they are when you’re in the middle of a job search. Read on for six good reasons to keep your resume updated—always.

1. In Case You Want to Present Yourself as an Expert

2. In Case Someone Wants to Nominate You For Something

3. In Case You Want to Pick Up Some Side Work

4. In Case You Have Secret Admirers

5. In Case a Promotion Comes Up at Work

6. In Case the Worst Happens

This article was originally published on The Daily Muse.   Click here to read it in its entirety

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Hiring Rebound

(via Linkedin.com) Hiring Rebound Around the Corner?  Despite the gloomy news, economic and otherwise, there was a small bit of positive data from the US Department that hints at a big hiring pickup in the next few months. Their monthly JOLTS reports tracks total job openings, and the most recent report (April 12, 2013) indicated that the number of job postings in the public market has increased by over 300 thousand in February compared to January (see first graphic). This is the biggest increase in the past 15 months and the second biggest in the past three years.

This is big news since the JOLTS report is a strong predictor of monthly hiring in the next 2-3 months. As the demand for talent increases, job-seekers will have an easier time finding a job, with the talent hunters facing more challenges. (…more)

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Why I Won’t Be Reading Your Cover Letter

Is your cover letter ready to be sent out? Before you say yes, read this…

We had an open position we were trying to fill awhile back and I was amazed—or should I say appalled—at the blanket responses we received from job seekers. Potential candidates sent us cover letters describing experience they possessed that was completely irrelevant to our opening; it was the same as someone having a degree in veterinary medicine but seeking employment as an IT director.

Did these job seekers really think going on and on for paragraphs about irrelevant experience was going to make me want to read their resume—or even more so—interview them?

I think I understand the dilemma here: Truly active job seekers are sending out countless cover letters as quickly as humanly possible—probably exasperated by the sheer volume of applications they feel pressured to submit. It’s not a shot-in-the-dark game, people. Or a game of numbers.

I truly don’t believe it’s a situation where you have to submit 200 applications to receive two call-backs. What it comes down to is a matter of focus and relevancy. Can you make the correlation between your experience and career background and what the employer truly needs? I’ll give you a perfect example.   (…read more)

Courtesy:   Careerealism.com

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Made in the USA

Made in the USA

After years of offshore production, General Electric is moving much of its far-flung appliance-manufacturing operations back home. It is not alone. An exploration of the startling, sustainable, just-getting-started return of industry to the United States.

The Insourcing Boom – The Atlantic.

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Mistakes on LinkedIn

Candidates: 9 Mistakes on LinkedIn

What separates the master networkers from the amateurs? The former tend not to make these mistakes.

Lots of articles describe how to create a more marketable LinkedIn profile, how to find the right groups to join, how to choose the best profile photo… I should know, I’ve written about that. Oh, and that. Yep, and that too. Since most people understand the value of taking those steps, let’s go deeper. To really harness the power of LinkedIn, don’t make these mistakes:

1. You give only because you expect to receive.

Connect with people on LinkedIn and you can write a recommendation that gets displayed on their profiles.

That’s awesome, unless you’re only giving recommendations because you want one in return. Then it’s tacky.

For example, say you’re a plumber. A pipe burst and we call you at three in the morning. You immediately rush over, fix the leak, and save us from inadvertently converting our basement into a swimming pool. I’m extremely grateful and I write you a deservedly glowing recommendation.

Then I ask you to write a recommendation for me.

The problem is, you don’t know me professionally. The only thing you really know about me is that I could be heard in the background screaming like a little girl when my wife called you. How can you recommend me? You can’t. You shouldn’t. And you shouldn’t be asked to.

Give sincere recommendations. Recommend because you want to, not because you expect to receive a recommendation in return. The people who know and respect you may return the “favor.” If so, great; if not, also great. Either way you’ve given credit where credit is due.

(…read more)

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